Oberwolfach References on Mathematical Software

13 Search Results

3D-XplorMath

The primary goal of 3D-XplorMath is to allow users with little or no programming experience to see, with minimal effort, concrete visual representations of many different categories of mathematical objects and processes. To accomplish this, objects from each category are described internally by well-designed, parameterized data structures, and for each category a variety of rendering methods is provided to permit visualization of objects of the category in ways that are appropriate for various purposes. Each of the hundreds of built-in objects known to the program is assigned carefully chosen defaults so that, when the object is selected from a menu, the program can immediately construct a standard example of the object and render it in an optimized view. The user may then use various menus and dialogs to alter the parameters describing the shape and coloration of the object, change the viewpoint from which it is seen, select different rendering methods, etc. Moreover, as its name suggests, the program can display objects such as surfaces, space curves and polyhedra using various stereo techniques. In addition to the many built-in objects known to the program, a user can create "user-defined" objects by entering formulas using standard mathematical notation. Visualizations created by the program can be saved in jpeg and other graphic formats and the data defining 3D objects can be exported to other 3D programs (e.g., Bryce or POV-Ray) in formats such as .obj and .inc. Both built-in and user-defined objects can depend on parameters, and the program can create morphing animations by moving along a path in the parameter space, and these animations can then be saved as QuickTime movies. Each of the built-in objects has associated to it a so-called ATO (About This Object) file that provides documentation for the object. An early and more developed version of the program, written in Object Pascal, runs under the Macintosh Operating System and a Java-based cross-platform version is now also available.

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CoCoA

CoCoA is a system for Computations in Commutative Algebra. It is able to perform simple and sophisticated operations on multivaraiate polynomials and on various data related to them (ideals, modules, matrices, rational functions). For example, it can readily compute Grobner bases, syzygies and minimal free resolution, intersection, division, the radical of an ideal, the ideal of zero-dimensional schemes, Poincare' series and Hilbert functions, factorization of polynomials, toric ideals. The capabilities of CoCoA and the flexibility of its use are further enhanced by the dedicated high-level programming language. For convenience, the system offers a textual interface, an Emacs mode, and a graphical user interface common to most platforms.

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GAP

GAP is a system for computational discrete algebra, with particular emphasis on Computational Group Theory. GAP provides a programming language, a library of thousands of functions implementing algebraic algorithms written in the GAP language as well as large data libraries of algebraic objects. GAP is used in research and teaching for studying groups and their representations, rings, vector spaces, algebras, combinatorial structures, and more. GAP is developed by international cooperation. The system, including source, is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License. You can study and easily modify or extend GAP for your special use. The current version is GAP 4, the older version GAP 3 is still available.

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HiFlow³

HiFlow³ is a multi-purpose finite element software providing powerful tools for efficient and accurate solution of a wide range of problems modeled by partial differential equations. Based on object-oriented concepts and the full capabilities of C++ the HiFlow³ project follows a modular and generic approach for building efficient parallel numerical solvers. It provides highly capable modules dealing with the mesh setup, finite element spaces, degrees of freedom, linear algebra routines, numerical solvers, and output data for visualization. Parallelism – as the basis for high performance simulations on modern computing systems – is introduced on two levels: coarse-grained parallelism by means of distributed grids and distributed data structures, and fine-grained parallelism by means of platform-optimized linear algebra back-ends.

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LiE

LiE is the name of a software package that enables mathematicians and physicists to perform computations of a Lie group theoretic nature. It focuses on the representation theory of complex semisimple (reductive) Lie groups and algebras, and on the structure of their Weyl groups and root systems. LiE does not compute directly with elements of the Lie groups and algebras themselves; it rather computes with weights, roots, characters and similar objects.

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MuPad

MuPAD is a mathematical expert system for doing symbolic and exact algebraic computations as well as numerical calculations with almost arbitrary accuracy. For example, the number of significant digits can be chosen freely. Apart from a vast variety of mathematical libraries the system provides tools for high quality visualization of 2- and 3-dimensional objects. On Microsoft Windows, Apple Macintosh and Linux systems, MuPAD offers a flexible notebook concept for creating mathematical documents combining texts, graphics, formulas, computations and mathematical visualizations and animations. On Microsoft Windows MuPAD further supports the technologies OLE, ActiveX Automation, DCOM, RTF and HTML. Thus it offers a natural integration in Office applications like Word or PowerPoint as well as others.

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Normaliz

Normaliz is a tool for computations in affine monoids, vector configurations, lattice polytopes, and rational cones. Its input data can be specified in terms of a system of generators or vertices or a system of linear homogeneous Diophantine equations, inequalities and congruences or a binomial ideal. Normaliz computes the dual cone of a rational cone (in other words, given generators, Normaliz computes the defining hyperplanes, and vice versa), a placing (or lexicographic) triangulation of a vector configuration (resulting in a triangulation of the cone generated by it), the Hilbert basis of a rational cone, the lattice points of a lattice polytope, the normalization of an affine monoid, the Hilbert (or Ehrhart) series and the Hilbert (or Ehrhart) (quasi) polynomial under a Z-grading (for example, for rational polytopes), NEW: generalized (or weighted) Ehrhart series and Lebesgue integrals of polynomials over rational polytopes via NmzIntegrate, a description of the cone and lattice under consideration by a system of inequalities, equations and congruences

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PLTMG

PLTMG is a package for solving elliptic partial differential equations in general regions of the plane. It is based on continuous piecewise linear triangular finite elements, and features adaptive local mesh refinement, multigraph iteration, and pseudo-arclength continuation options for parameter dependencies. It also provides options for solving several classes of optimal control and obstacle problems. The package includes an initial mesh generator and several graphics packages. Support for the Bank-Holst parallel adaptive meshing strategy is also provided. PLTMG is provided as Fortran (and a little C) source code, in both single and double precision versions. The code has interfaces to X-Windows, MPI, and Michael Holst's OpenGL image viewer SG. The X-Windows, MPI, and SG interfaces require libraries that are NOT provided as part of the PLTMG package.

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PolyBoRi

The core of PolyBoRi is a C++ library, which provides high-level data types for Boolean polynomials and monomials, exponent vectors, as well as for the underlying polynomial rings and subsets of the powerset of the Boolean variables. As a unique approach, binary decision diagrams are used as internal storage type for polynomial structures. On top of this C++-library we provide a Python interface. This allows parsing of complex polynomial systems, as well as sophisticated and extendable strategies for Gröbner base computation. PolyBoRi features a powerful reference implementation for Gröbner basis computation.

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polymake

polymake is an object-oriented system for experimental discrete mathematics. The typical working cycle of a polymake user starts with the construction of an object of interest, auch as a convex polytope, a finite simplicial complex, a graph, etc. It is then possible to ask the system for some of the object's properties or for some form of visualization. Further steps might include more elaborate constructions based on previously defined objects. Each class of polymake objects comes with a set of rules which describe how a new property of an object can be derived from previously known ones. It is a key feature that the user can extend or modify the set of rules, add further properties or even new classes of objects (with entirely new rule bases). The functions provided include: several convex hull algorithms, face lattices of convex polytopes, Voronoi diagrams and Delaunay decompositions (in arbitrary dimensions), simplicial homology (with integer coefficients), simplicial cup and cap products, intersection forms of triangulated 4-manifolds. Several forms of (interactive) visualization via interfaces to Geomview, JavaView and other programs.

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SINGULAR

SINGULAR is a Computer Algebra system for polynomial computations in commutative algebra, algebraic geometry, and singularity theory. SINGULAR's main computational objects are ideals and modules over a large variety of baserings. The baserings are polynomial rings over a field (e.g., finite fields, the rationals, floats, algebraic extensions, transcendental extensions), or localizations thereof, or quotient rings with respect to an ideal. SINGULAR features fast and general implementations for computing Groebner and standard bases, including e.g. Buchberger's algorithm and Mora's Tangent Cone algorithm. Furthermore, it provides polynomial factorizations, resultant, characteristic set and gcd computations, syzygy and free-resolution computations, and many more related functionalities. Based on an easy-to-use interactive shell and a C-like programming language, SINGULAR's internal functionality is augmented and user-extendible by libraries written in the SINGULAR programming language. A general and efficient implementation of communication links allows SINGULAR to make its functionality available to other programs.

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Sums over integral points of a polygon

Maple program for computing the sum of values of a polynomial function over the set of integral points of a polygon and the corresponding weighted Ehrhart quasi-polynomial.

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SuperLU

SuperLU is a general purpose library for the direct solution of large, sparse, nonsymmetric systems of linear equations on high performance machines. The library is written in C and is callable from either C or Fortran. The library routines will perform an LU decomposition with partial pivoting and triangular system solves through forward and back substitution. The LU factorization routines can handle non-square matrices but the triangular solves are performed only for square matrices. The matrix columns may be preordered (before factorization) either through library or user supplied routines. This preordering for sparsity is completely separate from the factorization. Working precision iterative refinement subroutines are provided for improved backward stability. Routines are also provided to equilibrate the system, estimate the condition number, calculate the relative backward error, and estimate error bounds for the refined solutions.

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