Oberwolfach References on Mathematical Software

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The primary goal of 3D-XplorMath is to allow users with little or no programming experience to see, with minimal effort, concrete visual representations of many different categories of mathematical objects and processes. To accomplish this, objects from each category are described internally by well-designed, parameterized data structures, and for each category a variety of rendering methods is provided to permit visualization of objects of the category in ways that are appropriate for various purposes. Each of the hundreds of built-in objects known to the program is assigned carefully chosen defaults so that, when the object is selected from a menu, the program can immediately construct a standard example of the object and render it in an optimized view. The user may then use various menus and dialogs to alter the parameters describing the shape and coloration of the object, change the viewpoint from which it is seen, select different rendering methods, etc. Moreover, as its name suggests, the program can display objects such as surfaces, space curves and polyhedra using various stereo techniques. In addition to the many built-in objects known to the program, a user can create "user-defined" objects by entering formulas using standard mathematical notation. Visualizations created by the program can be saved in jpeg and other graphic formats and the data defining 3D objects can be exported to other 3D programs (e.g., Bryce or POV-Ray) in formats such as .obj and .inc. Both built-in and user-defined objects can depend on parameters, and the program can create morphing animations by moving along a path in the parameter space, and these animations can then be saved as QuickTime movies. Each of the built-in objects has associated to it a so-called ATO (About This Object) file that provides documentation for the object. An early and more developed version of the program, written in Object Pascal, runs under the Macintosh Operating System and a Java-based cross-platform version is now also available.

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Global Optimization Toolbox For Maple

Optimization is the science of finding solutions that satisfy complicated constraints and objectives. In engineering, constraints may arise from technical issues. In business, constraints are related to many factors, including cost, time, and staff. The objective of global optimization is to find [numerically] the absolute best solution of highly nonlinear optimization models that may have a number of locally optimal solutions. Global optimization problems can be extremely difficult. Frequently engineers and researchers are forced to settle for solutions that are “good enough” at the expense of extra time, money, and resources, because the best solution has not been found. Using the Global Optimization Toolbox, you can formulate your optimization model easily inside the powerful Maple numeric and symbolic system, and then use world-class Maple numeric solvers to return the best answer, fast! Illustrative references: 1. Pintér, J. D. Global Optimization in Action. Springer Science, 1996, 512 p., ISBN: 978-0-7923-3757-7 Winner of the 2000 INFORMS Computing Society Prize. 2. Pintér, J. D., Linder, D. and Chin, P. Global Optimization Toolbox for Maple: An introduction with illustrative applications. Optimization Methods and Software 21 (2006) (4) 565-582.

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polymake is an object-oriented system for experimental discrete mathematics. The typical working cycle of a polymake user starts with the construction of an object of interest, auch as a convex polytope, a finite simplicial complex, a graph, etc. It is then possible to ask the system for some of the object's properties or for some form of visualization. Further steps might include more elaborate constructions based on previously defined objects. Each class of polymake objects comes with a set of rules which describe how a new property of an object can be derived from previously known ones. It is a key feature that the user can extend or modify the set of rules, add further properties or even new classes of objects (with entirely new rule bases). The functions provided include: several convex hull algorithms, face lattices of convex polytopes, Voronoi diagrams and Delaunay decompositions (in arbitrary dimensions), simplicial homology (with integer coefficients), simplicial cup and cap products, intersection forms of triangulated 4-manifolds. Several forms of (interactive) visualization via interfaces to Geomview, JavaView and other programs.

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SINGULAR is a Computer Algebra system for polynomial computations in commutative algebra, algebraic geometry, and singularity theory. SINGULAR's main computational objects are ideals and modules over a large variety of baserings. The baserings are polynomial rings over a field (e.g., finite fields, the rationals, floats, algebraic extensions, transcendental extensions), or localizations thereof, or quotient rings with respect to an ideal. SINGULAR features fast and general implementations for computing Groebner and standard bases, including e.g. Buchberger's algorithm and Mora's Tangent Cone algorithm. Furthermore, it provides polynomial factorizations, resultant, characteristic set and gcd computations, syzygy and free-resolution computations, and many more related functionalities. Based on an easy-to-use interactive shell and a C-like programming language, SINGULAR's internal functionality is augmented and user-extendible by libraries written in the SINGULAR programming language. A general and efficient implementation of communication links allows SINGULAR to make its functionality available to other programs.

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SYNAPS (Symbolic and Numeric APplicationS) is a library developed in C++. The aim of this open source project is to provide a coherent and efficient library for symbolic and numeric computation. It implements data-structures and classes for the manipulation of basic objects, such as (dense, sparse, structured) vectors, matrices, univariate and multivariate polynomials. It also provides fundamental methods such as algebraic number manipulation tools, different types of univariate and multivariate polynomial root solvers, resultant computations, ...

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