Oberwolfach References on Mathematical Software

24 Search Results

3D-XplorMath

The primary goal of 3D-XplorMath is to allow users with little or no programming experience to see, with minimal effort, concrete visual representations of many different categories of mathematical objects and processes. To accomplish this, objects from each category are described internally by well-designed, parameterized data structures, and for each category a variety of rendering methods is provided to permit visualization of objects of the category in ways that are appropriate for various purposes. Each of the hundreds of built-in objects known to the program is assigned carefully chosen defaults so that, when the object is selected from a menu, the program can immediately construct a standard example of the object and render it in an optimized view. The user may then use various menus and dialogs to alter the parameters describing the shape and coloration of the object, change the viewpoint from which it is seen, select different rendering methods, etc. Moreover, as its name suggests, the program can display objects such as surfaces, space curves and polyhedra using various stereo techniques. In addition to the many built-in objects known to the program, a user can create "user-defined" objects by entering formulas using standard mathematical notation. Visualizations created by the program can be saved in jpeg and other graphic formats and the data defining 3D objects can be exported to other 3D programs (e.g., Bryce or POV-Ray) in formats such as .obj and .inc. Both built-in and user-defined objects can depend on parameters, and the program can create morphing animations by moving along a path in the parameter space, and these animations can then be saved as QuickTime movies. Each of the built-in objects has associated to it a so-called ATO (About This Object) file that provides documentation for the object. An early and more developed version of the program, written in Object Pascal, runs under the Macintosh Operating System and a Java-based cross-platform version is now also available.

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Cinderella

Cinderella is a software system for doing geometry on a computer. The new version Cinderella.2 also includes physics simulations and algorithmic elements.

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CoCoA

CoCoA is a system for Computations in Commutative Algebra. It is able to perform simple and sophisticated operations on multivaraiate polynomials and on various data related to them (ideals, modules, matrices, rational functions). For example, it can readily compute Grobner bases, syzygies and minimal free resolution, intersection, division, the radical of an ideal, the ideal of zero-dimensional schemes, Poincare' series and Hilbert functions, factorization of polynomials, toric ideals. The capabilities of CoCoA and the flexibility of its use are further enhanced by the dedicated high-level programming language. For convenience, the system offers a textual interface, an Emacs mode, and a graphical user interface common to most platforms.

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Fermat

Fermat is a super calculator - computer algebra system, in which the basic items being computed can be rational numbers, modular numbers, elements of finite fields, multivariable polynomials, multivariable rational functions, or multivariable polynomials modulo other polynomials. Fermat is available for Mac OS, Windows, Unix, and Linux. It is shareware. The basic “ground ring" F is the field of rational numbers. One may choose to work modulo a specified integer n, thereby changing the ground ring F from Q to Z/n. On top of this may be attached any number of unevaluated variables t_1, t_2, .. t_n., thereby creating the polynomial ring F[t_1, t_2, .. t_n] and its quotient field, the rational functions. Further, polynomials p, q, .. can be chosen to mod out with, creating the quotient ring F(t_1, t_2, ..)/[p, q, ...]. It is possible to allow Laurent polynomials. Once the computational ring is established in this way, all computations are of elements of this ring.

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GAP

GAP is a system for computational discrete algebra, with particular emphasis on Computational Group Theory. GAP provides a programming language, a library of thousands of functions implementing algebraic algorithms written in the GAP language as well as large data libraries of algebraic objects. GAP is used in research and teaching for studying groups and their representations, rings, vector spaces, algebras, combinatorial structures, and more. GAP is developed by international cooperation. The system, including source, is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License. You can study and easily modify or extend GAP for your special use. The current version is GAP 4, the older version GAP 3 is still available.

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GELDA

GELDA is a Fortran77 software package for the numerical integration of general linear differential-algebraic equations (DAE) with variable coefficients of arbitrary index. The implementation of GELDA is based on the construction of the discretization scheme, which first determines all the local invariants and then transforms the linear DAE into an equivalent strangeness-free DAE with the same solution set. The resulting strangeness-free system is allowed to have nonuniqueness in the solution set or inconsistency in the initial values or inhomogeneities. In the case that the DAE is found to be uniquely solvable, GELDA is able to compute a consistent initial value and apply the well-known integration schemes for DAEs. In GELDA the BDF methods and Runge-Kutta schemes are implemented.

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Global Optimization Toolbox For Maple

Optimization is the science of finding solutions that satisfy complicated constraints and objectives. In engineering, constraints may arise from technical issues. In business, constraints are related to many factors, including cost, time, and staff. The objective of global optimization is to find [numerically] the absolute best solution of highly nonlinear optimization models that may have a number of locally optimal solutions. Global optimization problems can be extremely difficult. Frequently engineers and researchers are forced to settle for solutions that are “good enough” at the expense of extra time, money, and resources, because the best solution has not been found. Using the Global Optimization Toolbox, you can formulate your optimization model easily inside the powerful Maple numeric and symbolic system, and then use world-class Maple numeric solvers to return the best answer, fast! Illustrative references: 1. Pintér, J. D. Global Optimization in Action. Springer Science, 1996, 512 p., ISBN: 978-0-7923-3757-7 Winner of the 2000 INFORMS Computing Society Prize. 2. Pintér, J. D., Linder, D. and Chin, P. Global Optimization Toolbox for Maple: An introduction with illustrative applications. Optimization Methods and Software 21 (2006) (4) 565-582.

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HiFlow³

HiFlow³ is a multi-purpose finite element software providing powerful tools for efficient and accurate solution of a wide range of problems modeled by partial differential equations. Based on object-oriented concepts and the full capabilities of C++ the HiFlow³ project follows a modular and generic approach for building efficient parallel numerical solvers. It provides highly capable modules dealing with the mesh setup, finite element spaces, degrees of freedom, linear algebra routines, numerical solvers, and output data for visualization. Parallelism – as the basis for high performance simulations on modern computing systems – is introduced on two levels: coarse-grained parallelism by means of distributed grids and distributed data structures, and fine-grained parallelism by means of platform-optimized linear algebra back-ends.

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Isabelle

Isabelle is a popular generic theorem prover developed at Cambridge University and TU Munich. Existing logics like Isabelle/HOL provide a theorem proving environment ready to use for sizable applications. Isabelle may also serve as framework for rapid prototyping of deductive systems. It comes with a large library including Isabelle/HOL (classical higher-order logic), Isabelle/HOLCF (Scott's Logic for Computable Functions with HOL), Isabelle/FOL (classical and intuitionistic first-order logic), and Isabelle/ZF (Zermelo-Fraenkel set theory on top of FOL).

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KANT

KASH/KANT is a computer algebra system for sophisticated computations in algebraic number fields and global function fields. It has been developed under the project leadership of Prof. Dr. M. Pohst at Technische Universität Berlin.

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LiE

LiE is the name of a software package that enables mathematicians and physicists to perform computations of a Lie group theoretic nature. It focuses on the representation theory of complex semisimple (reductive) Lie groups and algebras, and on the structure of their Weyl groups and root systems. LiE does not compute directly with elements of the Lie groups and algebras themselves; it rather computes with weights, roots, characters and similar objects.

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Macaulay 2

Macaulay 2 is a software system devoted to supporting research in algebraic geometry and commutative algebra, whose development has been funded by the National Science Foundation.

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Maple

Maple is an environment for scientific and engineering problem-solving, mathematical exploration, data visualization and technical authoring.

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Mathematica

Mathematica seamlessly integrates a numeric and symbolic computational engine, graphics system, programming language, documentation system, and advanced connectivity to other applications.

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Maxima

Maxima is a system for the manipulation of symbolic and numerical expressions, including differentiation, integration, Taylor series, Laplace transforms, ordinary differential equations, systems of linear equations, and vectors, matrices, and tensors. Maxima produces high precision results by using exact fractions and arbitrarily long floating point representations, and can plot functions and data in two and three dimensions.

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MuPad

MuPAD is a mathematical expert system for doing symbolic and exact algebraic computations as well as numerical calculations with almost arbitrary accuracy. For example, the number of significant digits can be chosen freely. Apart from a vast variety of mathematical libraries the system provides tools for high quality visualization of 2- and 3-dimensional objects. On Microsoft Windows, Apple Macintosh and Linux systems, MuPAD offers a flexible notebook concept for creating mathematical documents combining texts, graphics, formulas, computations and mathematical visualizations and animations. On Microsoft Windows MuPAD further supports the technologies OLE, ActiveX Automation, DCOM, RTF and HTML. Thus it offers a natural integration in Office applications like Word or PowerPoint as well as others.

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Normaliz

Normaliz is a tool for computations in affine monoids, vector configurations, lattice polytopes, and rational cones. Its input data can be specified in terms of a system of generators or vertices or a system of linear homogeneous Diophantine equations, inequalities and congruences or a binomial ideal. Normaliz computes the dual cone of a rational cone (in other words, given generators, Normaliz computes the defining hyperplanes, and vice versa), a placing (or lexicographic) triangulation of a vector configuration (resulting in a triangulation of the cone generated by it), the Hilbert basis of a rational cone, the lattice points of a lattice polytope, the normalization of an affine monoid, the Hilbert (or Ehrhart) series and the Hilbert (or Ehrhart) (quasi) polynomial under a Z-grading (for example, for rational polytopes), NEW: generalized (or weighted) Ehrhart series and Lebesgue integrals of polynomials over rational polytopes via NmzIntegrate, a description of the cone and lattice under consideration by a system of inequalities, equations and congruences

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PLTMG

PLTMG is a package for solving elliptic partial differential equations in general regions of the plane. It is based on continuous piecewise linear triangular finite elements, and features adaptive local mesh refinement, multigraph iteration, and pseudo-arclength continuation options for parameter dependencies. It also provides options for solving several classes of optimal control and obstacle problems. The package includes an initial mesh generator and several graphics packages. Support for the Bank-Holst parallel adaptive meshing strategy is also provided. PLTMG is provided as Fortran (and a little C) source code, in both single and double precision versions. The code has interfaces to X-Windows, MPI, and Michael Holst's OpenGL image viewer SG. The X-Windows, MPI, and SG interfaces require libraries that are NOT provided as part of the PLTMG package.

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rbMIT

The rbMIT © MIT software package implements in Matlab® all the general reduced basis algorithms. The rbMIT © MIT software package is intended to serve both (as Matlab® source) "Developers" — numerical analysts and computational tool-builders — who wish to further develop the methodology, and (as Matlab® "executables") "Users" — computational engineers and educators — who wish to rapidly apply the methodology to new applications. The rbMIT software package was awarded with the Springer Computational Science and Engineering Prize in 2009.

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Risa/Asir

Risa/Asir is a general computer algebra system and also a tool for various computation in mathematics and engineering. The development of Risa/Asir started in 1989 at FUJITSU. Binaries have been freely available since 1994 and now the source code is also free. Currently Kobe distribution is the most active branch of its development. We characterize Risa/Asir as follows: (1) An environment for large scale and efficient polynomial computation. (2) A platform for parallel and distributed computation based on OpenXM protocols.

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Sage

SAGE is a framework for number theory, algebra, and geometry computation. It is open source and freely available under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). SAGE is a Python library with a customized interpreter. It is written in Python, C++, and C (via Pyrex). Python (http://www.python.org) is an open source object-oriented interpreted language, with a large number of libraries, e.g., for numerical analysis, which are available to users of SAGE. Python can also be accessed in library mode from C/C++ programs. SAGE provides an interface to several important open source libraries, including Cremona’s MWRANK library for computing with elliptic curves, the PARI library (pari.math.u-bordeaux.fr) for number theory, Shoup’s number theory library NTL (http://www.shoup.net/ntl/), SINGULAR (http://www.singular.uni-kl.de) for commutative algebra, GAP (http://www.gap-system.org) for group theory and combinatorics, and maxima (http://maxima.sourceforge.net) for symbolic computation and calculus.

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SINGULAR

SINGULAR is a Computer Algebra system for polynomial computations in commutative algebra, algebraic geometry, and singularity theory. SINGULAR's main computational objects are ideals and modules over a large variety of baserings. The baserings are polynomial rings over a field (e.g., finite fields, the rationals, floats, algebraic extensions, transcendental extensions), or localizations thereof, or quotient rings with respect to an ideal. SINGULAR features fast and general implementations for computing Groebner and standard bases, including e.g. Buchberger's algorithm and Mora's Tangent Cone algorithm. Furthermore, it provides polynomial factorizations, resultant, characteristic set and gcd computations, syzygy and free-resolution computations, and many more related functionalities. Based on an easy-to-use interactive shell and a C-like programming language, SINGULAR's internal functionality is augmented and user-extendible by libraries written in the SINGULAR programming language. A general and efficient implementation of communication links allows SINGULAR to make its functionality available to other programs.

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Sums over integral points of a polygon

Maple program for computing the sum of values of a polynomial function over the set of integral points of a polygon and the corresponding weighted Ehrhart quasi-polynomial.

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SuperLU

SuperLU is a general purpose library for the direct solution of large, sparse, nonsymmetric systems of linear equations on high performance machines. The library is written in C and is callable from either C or Fortran. The library routines will perform an LU decomposition with partial pivoting and triangular system solves through forward and back substitution. The LU factorization routines can handle non-square matrices but the triangular solves are performed only for square matrices. The matrix columns may be preordered (before factorization) either through library or user supplied routines. This preordering for sparsity is completely separate from the factorization. Working precision iterative refinement subroutines are provided for improved backward stability. Routines are also provided to equilibrate the system, estimate the condition number, calculate the relative backward error, and estimate error bounds for the refined solutions.

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