Oberwolfach References on Mathematical Software

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Global Optimization Toolbox For Maple

Optimization is the science of finding solutions that satisfy complicated constraints and objectives. In engineering, constraints may arise from technical issues. In business, constraints are related to many factors, including cost, time, and staff. The objective of global optimization is to find [numerically] the absolute best solution of highly nonlinear optimization models that may have a number of locally optimal solutions. Global optimization problems can be extremely difficult. Frequently engineers and researchers are forced to settle for solutions that are “good enough” at the expense of extra time, money, and resources, because the best solution has not been found. Using the Global Optimization Toolbox, you can formulate your optimization model easily inside the powerful Maple numeric and symbolic system, and then use world-class Maple numeric solvers to return the best answer, fast! Illustrative references: 1. Pintér, J. D. Global Optimization in Action. Springer Science, 1996, 512 p., ISBN: 978-0-7923-3757-7 Winner of the 2000 INFORMS Computing Society Prize. 2. Pintér, J. D., Linder, D. and Chin, P. Global Optimization Toolbox for Maple: An introduction with illustrative applications. Optimization Methods and Software 21 (2006) (4) 565-582.

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HiFlow³ is a multi-purpose finite element software providing powerful tools for efficient and accurate solution of a wide range of problems modeled by partial differential equations. Based on object-oriented concepts and the full capabilities of C++ the HiFlow³ project follows a modular and generic approach for building efficient parallel numerical solvers. It provides highly capable modules dealing with the mesh setup, finite element spaces, degrees of freedom, linear algebra routines, numerical solvers, and output data for visualization. Parallelism – as the basis for high performance simulations on modern computing systems – is introduced on two levels: coarse-grained parallelism by means of distributed grids and distributed data structures, and fine-grained parallelism by means of platform-optimized linear algebra back-ends.

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Mathematica seamlessly integrates a numeric and symbolic computational engine, graphics system, programming language, documentation system, and advanced connectivity to other applications.

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Normaliz is a tool for computations in affine monoids, vector configurations, lattice polytopes, and rational cones. Its input data can be specified in terms of a system of generators or vertices or a system of linear homogeneous Diophantine equations, inequalities and congruences or a binomial ideal. Normaliz computes the dual cone of a rational cone (in other words, given generators, Normaliz computes the defining hyperplanes, and vice versa), a placing (or lexicographic) triangulation of a vector configuration (resulting in a triangulation of the cone generated by it), the Hilbert basis of a rational cone, the lattice points of a lattice polytope, the normalization of an affine monoid, the Hilbert (or Ehrhart) series and the Hilbert (or Ehrhart) (quasi) polynomial under a Z-grading (for example, for rational polytopes), NEW: generalized (or weighted) Ehrhart series and Lebesgue integrals of polynomials over rational polytopes via NmzIntegrate, a description of the cone and lattice under consideration by a system of inequalities, equations and congruences

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The rbMIT © MIT software package implements in Matlab® all the general reduced basis algorithms. The rbMIT © MIT software package is intended to serve both (as Matlab® source) "Developers" — numerical analysts and computational tool-builders — who wish to further develop the methodology, and (as Matlab® "executables") "Users" — computational engineers and educators — who wish to rapidly apply the methodology to new applications. The rbMIT software package was awarded with the Springer Computational Science and Engineering Prize in 2009.

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Risa/Asir is a general computer algebra system and also a tool for various computation in mathematics and engineering. The development of Risa/Asir started in 1989 at FUJITSU. Binaries have been freely available since 1994 and now the source code is also free. Currently Kobe distribution is the most active branch of its development. We characterize Risa/Asir as follows: (1) An environment for large scale and efficient polynomial computation. (2) A platform for parallel and distributed computation based on OpenXM protocols.

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