Oberwolfach References on Mathematical Software

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CGAL is a collaborative effort of several sites in Europe and Israel. The goal is to make the most important of the solutions and methods developed in computational geometry available to users in industry and academia in a C++ library. The goal is to provide easy access to useful, reliable geometric algorithms The CGAL library contains: the Kernel with geometric primitives such as points, vectors, lines, predicates for testing things such as relative positions of points, and operations such as intersections and distance calculation, the Basic Library which is a collection of standard data structures and geometric algorithms, such as convex hull in 2D/3D, (Delaunay) triangulation in 2D/3D, planar map, polyhedron, smallest enclosing circle, and multidimensional query structures, the Support Library which offers interfaces to other packages, e.g., for visualisation, and I/O, and other support facilities.

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Fermat is a super calculator - computer algebra system, in which the basic items being computed can be rational numbers, modular numbers, elements of finite fields, multivariable polynomials, multivariable rational functions, or multivariable polynomials modulo other polynomials. Fermat is available for Mac OS, Windows, Unix, and Linux. It is shareware. The basic “ground ring" F is the field of rational numbers. One may choose to work modulo a specified integer n, thereby changing the ground ring F from Q to Z/n. On top of this may be attached any number of unevaluated variables t_1, t_2, .. t_n., thereby creating the polynomial ring F[t_1, t_2, .. t_n] and its quotient field, the rational functions. Further, polynomials p, q, .. can be chosen to mod out with, creating the quotient ring F(t_1, t_2, ..)/[p, q, ...]. It is possible to allow Laurent polynomials. Once the computational ring is established in this way, all computations are of elements of this ring.

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Global Optimization Toolbox For Maple

Optimization is the science of finding solutions that satisfy complicated constraints and objectives. In engineering, constraints may arise from technical issues. In business, constraints are related to many factors, including cost, time, and staff. The objective of global optimization is to find [numerically] the absolute best solution of highly nonlinear optimization models that may have a number of locally optimal solutions. Global optimization problems can be extremely difficult. Frequently engineers and researchers are forced to settle for solutions that are “good enough” at the expense of extra time, money, and resources, because the best solution has not been found. Using the Global Optimization Toolbox, you can formulate your optimization model easily inside the powerful Maple numeric and symbolic system, and then use world-class Maple numeric solvers to return the best answer, fast! Illustrative references: 1. Pintér, J. D. Global Optimization in Action. Springer Science, 1996, 512 p., ISBN: 978-0-7923-3757-7 Winner of the 2000 INFORMS Computing Society Prize. 2. Pintér, J. D., Linder, D. and Chin, P. Global Optimization Toolbox for Maple: An introduction with illustrative applications. Optimization Methods and Software 21 (2006) (4) 565-582.

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